Dialog Box

New drug brings new hope in the treatment of ovarian cancer

Leading cancer drug developer Invion Limited and its research partner, the Hudson Institute of Medical Research, are pleased with the performance of their new drug IVX-PO2 during its initial animal testing phase.

The drug proved successful in targeting cancerous cells that have spread from a primary tumour (metastatic cancer). IVX-PO2 was only absorbed by the circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in the blood stream, and not red blood cells or organs. The ground-breaking findings mean that IVX-PO2 can be used as a milder treatment for solid tumours and blood cancers like leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma.

Leading cancer drug developer Invion Limited and its research partner, the Hudson Institute of Medical Research, are pleased with the performance of their new drug IVX-PO2 during its initial animal testing phase.

The drug proved successful in targeting cancerous cells that have spread from a primary tumour (metastatic cancer). IVX-PO2 was only absorbed by the circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in the blood stream, and not red blood cells or organs. The ground-breaking findings mean that IVX-PO2 can be used as a milder treatment for solid tumours and blood cancers like leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma.

IVX-PO2 is the product of new Photosoft technology that uses non-toxic photosensitisers, visible light and oxygen to kill cancerous cells, shut down tumours and stimulate the immune system; unlike radiotherapy and chemotherapy which suppress the immune system.

Experimentation using IVX-PO2 to treat ovarian cancer in mice is already underway. Dr Andrew Stephens, Group Head of the Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers Research Group at the Hudson Institute, says initial results will drive clinical trials – particularly for chemotherapy resistant tumours.

25 July 2019
Category: Research
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